NOTEWORTHY CASES

2009 |
United States v. T.K.

As co-counsel with legendary attorney James E. Ferguson, II, Jake Sussman represented an attorney who was charged in federal court with multiple counts of obstruction of justice and witness tampering. The defense successfully severed the six charges into three separate trials, as well as limited what evidence the prosecution would be able to use at trial. On the eve of jury selection in the first trial, the defense was able to successfully resolve the entire case and all charges were ultimately dismissed. Sussman continued representing T.K. in proceedings before the North Carolina State Bar.

 
2009 |
Jones v. Graham County Board of Education

In 2009, Luke Largess represented employees of the Graham County Board of Education in a challenge to the Board’s policy mandating the random, suspicionless drug and alcohol testing of all Board employees. The Court of Appeals held that the policy violated the North Carolina Constitution’s guarantees against unreasonable searches and seizures.

 
2009 |
United States v. D.D.

Noell Tin and Matt Pruden represented a defendant convicted of federal firearms offenses. Over the government’s objection, they successfully argued that several of the felony convictions should be reduced to misdemeanor convictions. The court then reduced all but one conviction to misdemeanors. The government asked the court to sentence the defendant to 57 months in prison on the remaining felony conviction. After a contested sentencing hearing, the court sentenced the defendant to one year of probation.

 
2009 |
Paylor v. Town of Elon Police Department

While with the ACLU of North Carolina, Katy Parker successfully resolved a federal lawsuit on behalf of her client, John W. Paylor, who was repeatedly shot with a Taser by Elon Police officers while unarmed in his underwear and presenting no threat to the officers. Mr. Paylor was given a monetary settlement and the police department agreed to change its policies on Taser use.

 
2009 |
State v. C.G.

Matthew Pruden secured an acquittal of his client, a public school employee, against a charge of sexual battery of a student.