NOTEWORTHY CASES

2015 |
NC State Bar v. G.E.

Lane Williamson helped secure a complete victory at the NC State Bar on behalf of a longtime and well respected capital defense attorney who was accused of professional misconduct in connection with her work on a historic Racial Justice Act case. Following a hearing on September 25, 2015, a three-member Disciplinary Hearing Committee found no wrongdoing and ruled in the attorney’s favor.

For more about the case, click here.

 
2015 |
Kagonyera v. Buncombe County

Following the exoneration of Kenneth Kagonyera by the North Carolina Innocence Inquiry Commission, the law firm filed suit against Buncombe County and various current and former members of the Buncombe County Sheriff’s Office for their respective roles in the wrongful prosecution of Mr. Kagonyera. The lawsuit was ultimately resolved when the civil defendants agreed to pay Mr. Kagonyera $515,000. Click here for coverage of the civil lawsuit.

 
2015 |
United States v. Petraeus

On April 23, 2015, General David Petraeus, former military commander in the U.S. Army and former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, was sentenced to probation for the unauthorized removal and retention of classified information, a misdemeanor. Jake Sussman was a member of General David Petraeus’ defense team. Click here for media coverage of the case.

 
2015 |
Loy v. City of Salisbury

Jake Sussman and Salisbury attorney Randy Reamer brought an excessive force lawsuit on behalf of Rev. J.W. Loy against the Salisbury Police Department and one of its officers. Rev. Loy, who was 91 years old at the time, was injured after Officer C. Hamm tackled him to the floor during an encounter at an assisted living facility in Salisbury. The defendants agreed to pay Rev. Loy $180,000 to resolve the case.

 
2015 |
State v. J. R.

Noell Tin persuaded a Superior Court judge to dismiss all charges against J. R., including two counts of attempted first degree murder, due to J.R.’s severe mental illness which rendered him unable to stand trial for over seven years.

 
2015 |
United States v. Bernard von NotHaus

Mr. Von NotHaus, described by some as “the Rosa Parks of the constitutional currency movement,” hired Noell Tin to represent him at sentencing after a jury convicted him of various counterfeiting offenses based on his minting and distribution of the Liberty Dollar, an alternative currency which was backed by over 60 million US dollars’ worth of gold and silver. Mr. Von Nothaus faced over 20 years under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines. He was sentenced to a term of probation with six months home detention. Included in the sentencing judge’s findings was the conclusion that a sentence of incarceration would promote disrespect for the law.
Photograph by Michal Czerwonka for The New York Times.

See below for media coverage of this case:
New York Times Website
Read full article here

Forbes Website
Read full article here

 
2015 |
Inadequate Security Case Against Apartment Complex

Sam McGee represented a family in a case for the death of their adult son who was gunned down at his apartment complex. The details of this settlement are confidential, including the names of the parties and the venue in which the case was pending. However, we can disclose that the young man was completely innocent in the incident, and was shot several times by someone who apparently mistook him for someone else that was involved in a dispute. Plaintiff alleged that the apartment complex failed to have adequate security measures in place in light of significant crime in the area, and also that the apartment complex violated its own rules by failing to do required background checks and allowing felons to live on the property. The apartment complex contended that its security was adequate, and that it was unaware of the alleged perpetrator living on the property. The case settled for $850,000.00.

 
2015 |
Cook v. Turlington

Sam McGee and co-counsel Mac Sasser represented Michael Cook, who sustained a severe spinal injury in a motor vehicle accident. Mr. Cook was waiting on his motorcycle for a fire truck to clear an intersection when he was hit from behind by an SUV and thrown through the air into the middle of the intersection. His injury required spinal fusion surgery. Mr. Cook had been convicted of several misdemeanors, and was in jail awaiting trial on another alleged crime at the time of trial. Mr. McGee and Mr. Sasser shared these facts with the jury up front, and Mr. Cook was brutally honest about his situation. In the end, the jury focused on Michael’s injury, not his past, and rendered a verdict of $535,732.65. After an unsuccessful appeal, the defendant was faced with interest and costs on the judgment, and paid $756,000.00 to resolve the case.